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in algeria, but experts of his speech have been released. he will say that more of the same in the eu is not enough. he is also expected to demand a renegotiation of britain's membership with the block and then put the new terms to a public referendum. critics say he is pandering to euro skeptics in his own conservative party. for more on britain's relationship with the eu, we spoke to the president of the european parliament and asked first why he was so opposed to prime minister cameron's efforts to reclaim some of the powers london has ceded to brussels. >> i think we would need a stronger euro, but not a divided -- a stronger europe but not a divided europe, and i'm really surprised that britain is not a member of the euro. it would be useful that other countries and britain agreed the charter. we need a deeper integration of europe, and not a distraction of the european union. >> cameron seems headed down this road anyway with the threat of leaving the eu hanging in the background. is that fair? is he holding the eu to ransom? >> that would be really a disaster for great britain,
for the british people to say whether they want to be in the eu or out. some were quick to criticize the move, saying it could block future risk. our correspondent reports. >> it had been a long time coming, but at last, david cameron delivered his speech on europe. he began with a repeat of what has gone wrong. the ever closer eu integration, a more flexible approach from what is required. >> if we do not address these challenges, the danger is that europe will fail, and the british people will drift toward the exit. i do not want that to happen. i want the european union to be a success, and i want the relationship between britain and the european union that keeps us in it. >> the prime minister said the main problem with the growing gap between the european union and those is the there was resentment about rules and regulations. >> countries are different. they make different choices. we cannot harmonize everything. >> the solution, he said, was to try to claw back some power from the eu, and then when that was done, put it to the people. >> when we negotiate that new settlements, we will
david cameron promises to hold a referendum on the e.u. warning that a concession for the democratic leadership is wafer thin. >> if we don't address these challenges, the danger is that europe will fail and the british people will drift toward the exit. >>> google could light a fire under u.s. markets today as the giant's fourth quarter profits top forecasts on higher ad revenues. >>> and here in davos, bank ceos fight back against regulators in an exclusive cnbc debate, apologizing to scandals of the past but defiant it the role of the industry. >> i think there's so much misinformation out there that's used aggressively by people for their own purposes. we provide a service to you. we make a little money every time we do it. that's what happens. >>> and ceo confidence down for a third year in a row according to a survey here. despite markets hitting multiyear highs with lack of decisions in the u.s. weighing on sentiment. >>> okay, hello and welcome to the start of our coverage from the annual meeting of the world economic forum here in davos. day one of three come. kelly, i could
of there being a straight referendum on being an in/out referendum, part of the eu, not part of the eu, which is mixed from where most people think they are. >> some of the surveys show the people becoming more worried about it and we saw those comments, what's his face, labor leader over the weekend saying that he's walking out of the eurozone. so clearly, he finds that there's political gain to be made from -- >> and then you saw this british train commerce survey, just 26% of them wanted to keep the status quo, right? >> i thought this was extraordinary. i was surprises how low it is. in this survey, when you ask businesses about how much in favor they are of keeping things the same, only 24%. >> 59% wanted a looser relationship with the eurozone. most people would say, we want to stay part of the eu, but we would like to have far less regulation, far less judgments than just have been contemplated from the european court. >> is britain going to be able to say that where they get rid of the regulation and teen the market and all that? >> that's the number one question. >> and we will explo
of a couple in the last year to syria when the e.u.'s embargo changed, the provisions of that changed and so, i think those are advantages. >> thank you. >> mike gates. >> can you confirm in the case of an agreement between the u.k. and another government perhaps some kind of defense cooperation that doesn't have the same status as the, where we are talking about restrictions or controls on the arms exports that are purchased from british companies or exported from this country? in other words, if the mod decides to transfer equipment to another state that wouldn't be subjected to the same criteria as would apply with regards to the armed export regime? . . >> if you have further information; that would be helpful. okay. that's fine. can i ask you about the review as regards the workload that you referred to for ministers, the number of items for consideration: you said thorough overseeing of ministers went up 235 this year compared to 153 last year and 39 in the previous year before your middle east and north africa review. >> right. >> this is presumably dealt with by the human rights sect
because there are so many e.u. trips that i have been on with the bush administration and the obama administration where they blame the united states for bringing down the rest of the world when it comes to its state of the economy. it looks like now things are almost reversed in a way. tell us about your conversation with cameron. >> when i interviewed prime minister cameron here in new york and he was sort of in the lion's den because he had thrown down the gauntlet with this speech about britain's position in the european union. britain is not fully in in terms of it is not part of the eurozone. it doesn't have the euro but in many aspects it is in and it is a full member. united states depends on britain for the very strong role in international affairs. it helps all over the place whether in trying to confront iran, syria and north korea with sanctions and plays a big role whether afghanistan, iraq. david cameron is saying we like our foreign role. we like you and our economic role in the e.u. but we don't want to be a part of your political role. he is trying to negotiate a ha
.k., the british finance minister, george osbo e osborne, wants the e.u. to toughen bank regulation across the 27 member states. britain's set plans in motion to separate retail investment decisions in part on proposals from the finnish central bank governor. the fed is also reportedly considering a plan to help banks avoid costly regulations aimed at preventing derivatives trading from being subsidized by taxpayers. the "financial times" says it stems from the lincoln amendment, included in the 2010 dodd-frank law. it prohibits banks that have access to federal deposit insurance or fed credit from acting as derivatives dealers. u.s. banks will still be able to trade some products like interest rate swaps. under the rule, foreign banks would be forced to move their u.s. derivatives activities off their books. >> yeah. if you followed that, you get a gold star this morning. it's a tricky one. >> there's a law that means foreign banks will have problems trading derivatives in the united states. >> charlie, any thoughts here? >> you know, it's part of this broad regulatory framework being put in pla
results in europe look set for a change. the eu muniea explains his investigation into the search engine. he's convinced google is profiting by diverting internet traffic for certain businesses. >>> american skres announced better-than-expected earnings for the fourth quarter. it saw revenues of $8.4 had billion. it will make big restructuring changes which includes 5,400 job cuts throughout the quarter. shares dipped in extended hours of trading the. >>> and the fate of superman remains firmly with warner brothers and dc comics after a decision from a california court. the court of appeals said that the rights for the man of appeals should not stay with the cocreators. the decision means that warner can release this summer's new superman reboot without fear of legal challenges. so we're watching today. who is your favorite hee roar? superman, ironman, super mario draghi? whoever you like, e-mail us, tweet us. my produces asked me who i thought my favorite super hero was. it took my a while to think about it, but then i thought hong kong fooey. there you go. many happy memories. talking
in the election. >> i talk about this a lot, i consider myself a tpepl tph*eus, but when i watched what went on during the election and the way mitt romney was treated and the hypocrisy where the binders full of women was really ridiculed, an was treated like he was a massage tph*eus, basically and you see a picture like this with president obama, and you have the left basically making excuses for him. ruth marcus wrote something saying, it's bad but it's not an outrage. it's an outrage if it's a republican. i think this is why when they survey women and ask you do you consider a tpepl tph*eu a tpepl inch tph*eus, most women say no. martha: they don't like the implications that go along witness. let's take a look at some of the numbers here, there is a comparison of how presidents have done in terms of gender equality. i guess for lack of a better phrase. women in the cabinet, president obama so far has nine through the first term. president bush had ten total. bill clinton had 17 total. but what i was struck by, and as a woman i don't like these numbers comparison, to me it's like you don't
britain should leave the e.u. and what that would mean. that has a lot of people talking here about the implications for the u.k., for europe. whether -- we had this big discussion about new york versus london. what happens to the banking system. what happens to the financial? that is the u.k. that's become a big i issue. let's bring in a good friend, as i said, of "squawk." bob hormatz, you know him well. a new -- not a fancy new title, but you're the under secretary of state for economic growth, energy, and the environment. that changed a year ago? >> yes, we tried to pull these together. increasingly what happens in the economy has an impact on the environment. environmental issues and energy issues are increasingly intertwined. >> always big in davos. and david cameron, it has an impact on the global economy if this were to go forward. the chances of it going forward i think are small. he has to get re-elected in 2015 to propose the up or down vote in 2017. it does put a cloud over the u.k. and e.u. a bit. >> the u.s. view has been not to get involved in u.s. politics. the u.s.
african forces. >> germany has also offered transport aircraft. the eu is sending military trainers, but time is of the essence if the west is to prevent it from falling into the hands of the radical jihad is. >> on to business news now, the german economy contracted in the final quarter of last year as the eurozone crisis took its toll, but europe's biggest economy still managed to post modest growth of 0.7%. >> that may not sound like much, but it is more than you expect from most eurozone economies. >> the eurozone crisis has not been able to dampen the mood among eurozone consumers. they are still hitting shops and helping the economy grow modestly. >> despite big increases in the cost of energy, raw materials, and oil, private consumption is up. that is the first reason. the second is that the german economy remained competitive last year despite a weaker environment, and that has given exports a boost. >> exports are the backbone of the german economy. they continued to grow last year, albeit at a slower rate. companies are proceeding with caution. they are cutting investment
responsibility and accountability. dook at the e.u. -- look at the e.u. did the e.u. destroy greece or did greece destroy the e.u.? it's probably both. but they both blame each other. all of this arises from intergovernmental corporation and commandeering. they have the example of commandeering in front of them. and we'll see the article of confederation and they wrote the constitution that prohibits this and makes it very, very difficult. the second objection to justice briar or the objection to the second part, well, if the feds wants to send a swarm of officers, let them try as language la already suggested they can't and they won't. and if they do they will have to pay the fiscal and the political price. so i think in a weird way it would actually be great if we have f.b.i. agents and in santa clara breaking down the doors of gravely ill pot smokers that will tell people more than the cato institute. one last point about this and i'll end. you see the force of the anti-commandeering rule and something that justin mentioned and that is the affordable care act. this seems far removed but it isn
of the reasons that london and the u.k. is trying to get out of the eu. >> well, you know, you talk about london surpassing new york. maybe so. you know, the a-market in london turned out fraud in it and they're keeping your capital in the industrialized world is bad, the fact that there is-- you're losing business, you should not lose. london was important before new york and it will be again. the fact that they don't know what the use of the funds will be, not the biggest concern. (laughter) >> i don't get it it. >> adam. >> hold on, charlie. first of all, we know what the money is used for, charlie hit it on the head to continue the farce that they've created, the promises they have made. the empires that have fallen into the ocean and they're killing themselves, adam. >> it won't work. >> adam don't you think it ultimately makes it harder for europe to be the strong, dominant place it used to be? >> i don't think this is going to keep europe. it's not at the top of the list, let's say that, they've got plenty of problems. >> all right, gerri, plenty of problems, is this the right solution?
for military operations against the militants. the imf and the eu already pledged money to support the beleaguered economy. i jubilation and towns across northern mali. people here know how fragile of their security is. the militants may have vanished for now and the desert, but any sign of weakness and they could return. few relished the prospect of a long guerrilla war. >> let's get the latest live from timbuktu. tom went into timbuktu with the troops and he joins us live. the islamist rebels out of sight but not out of mind? >> exactly. they are believed to be hiding in surrounding desert. but i can tell you the tension is rising here in timbuktu. there are scenes of looting downtown, with dozens of people out in the streets going one shop after the other, targeting shops that were held by ethnic touraregs. accusing them of collaborating with ms -- islamists and they say they are hiding arms, cash, and weapons. the malian army deployed in town, and is trying to contain the crowd, although it is not clear because there also kind of smiling and waving at the crowd. they have pulle
. >> and chinese's li na advances with a straight sets win over radwanska. and in the men's draw, 2k5eu6ed ferrer came from two sets down to beat his spanish kinman. he will play after the defensive champions. there's an awful other names there, but here's one i know i can pronounce. it's aaron. and listen, we have that massive number in the beginning. the number of unemployed people around the world. 197 million people are now job less. but what's really upsetting is the vast increases to that number coming from the developing countries like europe. but we're seeing a massive spillover in asia and the worry is the engines of growth aren't driving the labor market -- let's explain, because the reports out today from the i.l.o. showing five years on from the start of the global financial crisis, it's the biggest -- last year the number of people losing their jobs rose by 4 million stretching that global jobless cue. you saw it at the top of the program, 197 million. this year, 2013, another five middle people are expected to lose their jobs which would take over. what's most worrying is the worst-
partnership, intergovernmental cooperation destroys responsibility and accountability. look at the e.u. to the e.u. destroy greece or decrease destroy the e.u.? is probably does, but you can't tell them they'll blame each other. the founders didn't need the e.u. to save his dangerous. all this arises for intergovernmental cooperation and common during. the founders didn't need the e.u. because they have the example comintern for them, the articles of confederation. there is a constitution that prohibits this and makes it very, very difficult in any event. the second objection to justice breyer or rather the objection to a second party is feds want to send sworn off officers. let them try. it seems already suggested, they can't enable and if they do, they will have to pay the fiscal and critical praise. so in a weird way, it would be great if we have fbi agents in santa clara breaking down the doors of pot smokers. i will. i will tell people more but the federal government than 50 papers from the cato institute. [laughter] >> one minus point and then i will end. this is a force of the a
, it is now the e.u. state that is coming up to the first of march deadline of the current e.u. whether they will want to amend that in any way. it could be amended to apply to the regime and not to the opposition forces but it could be amended in many other ways. as a that would require the agreement of all of the states. >> in the syrian opposition i'm interested to know if that could be linked but not lethal. how serious is this embargo and is it possible for example the communications equipment that could be used in conjunction with turkey and some other countries to the elements in your possession. >> well, it's not military. it's certainly not legal. the systems so far include some things like the deployment on the stabilization defense to work with the opposition on the future plans and how they are getting help for people's basic needs and oppositions and training the citizens. we are providing each other actable material in the kits and generators to help civilians in opposition the communications equipment to help activists overcome the communications, blackouts, blockages pro
. we tried for 20 years with kyoto and e.u. wanted to do a lot of good. i'm from europe. we ended up paying 20 or $30 billion to cut carbon emissions what you guys have done, done it for free. actually you've made money doing it because you also got cheaper energy. that is the way forward. also for china and india and everyone else. melissa: that is the argument too, a lot of people proponents of solar and wind whatever don't want to hear. while fracking has been profitable it has helped the environment. at the same time you look at things like there was this big story today out of wyoming where encana is drilling and there's a well is contaminated one way or the other. seems like it from the reports. they're dealing with all this. the neighbors in the neighborhood are saying pavilion, wyoming, this is a result of the fracking going on nearby. there is a case they would point to saying it is bad for the environment. >> listen there is nothing just fine. fracking also has its problems. we should definitely have it well-regulated. most water you get is from 100 feet down and most frack
time comprehensive eu7 immigration rm passed it of during republican leadership, of it bipartisan, it wassing should that did get more democratic votes, but failed during leadership of democrats in 2007, i believe, you can't blame one sydor the other, you have to come together, that is what the american people top see. i hope that is where the president is headed. lou: always good to talk with you. >> you got it, thank you, lou. lou: coming up tomorrow, appellate attorney, peter johnson, talking about second amendment and far more. and attorney general greg abbott will be here. and jed. next, a new pro nra video game. that is right, you will never guess what the national libya media is focused on. the a-team will take them a pa part. are you flo? yes. is this the thing you gave my husband? well, yeah, yes. the "name your price" tool. you tell us the price you want to pay, and we give you a range of options to choose from. careful, though -- that kind of power can go to your head. that explains a lot. yo, buddy! i got this. gimme one, gimme one, gimme one! the power of the
, last time comprehensive eu7 immigration rm passed it of during republican leadership, of it bipartisan, it wassing should that did get more democratic votes, but failed during leadership of democrats in 2007, i believe, you can't blame one sydor the other, you have to come together, that is what the american people top see. i hope that ishere the president is headed. lou: always good to talk with you. >> you got it, thank you, lou. lou: coming up tomorrow, appellate attorney, peter johnson, talking about second amendment and far more. and attorney general greg abbott will be here. and jed. next, a new pro nra video game. that is right, you will never guess what the national libya media is focused on. the a-team will take them a par lou: liberal plain stream media blasting nra for target shootig it comes a database of state gun laws, cnm, and nbc covering criticism surrending the nra's game release as an app. for some reason those organizations chose to ignore outrage over a new on-line video game in which players are actually they get points for murdering the president of the nra, and
" and "lemi s" topped the top fipples. 23eu78s. they strapped on ice skates and glided across the rink. the rink has been up since november and is set to close. if you want to get out there and and -- out there do it quickly. >> it is getting chilly out there. don't forget about the freeze warnings. from 2:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. expect the temperatures to drop below the freezing mark. tam cam is moving as the northerly winds are affecting us. let's get to the expected lows! 20 in the north bay. napa 25. moderate temperatures, if you can call it that near the coast and the bay with 36, 32 for oakland. interior east bay, a chilly bone cold night with antioch 29. the temperatures back east and the showers well all of this will be pushing off the coast. 63 degrees and some scattered showers. and it will be colder behind the front with st. louis 29 and denver light snow at 17. here is a look at the numbers around our state. fresno with sunshine 51. 56 for los angeles. 30 degrees tomorrow for tahoe. the accu-weather seven-day forecast, a couple more cold mornings and then get ready for nice, m
the e.u.'s jobless rate hitting 11.8%, 18.8 million people going without work. the highest is in spain, where a quarter of its working population is unemployed. youth unemployment is at a record high, and exports from germany and france are falling. it is among the top risks for investors here. ian, happy new year. we have seen u.s. stock prices climb to five-year heights, despite the risks in europe. are the risks getting more pronounced for global investors? >> no. the risks are overplayed. people have been concerned about the likelihood the eurozone was going to fall apart. you only had to have a economist description last year. i think they ran eight different cover stories, showing the euro either blowing up or breaking apart or bursting into flames. not going to happen. no greek exit. no anybody else exit. but the austerity that is hitting, and hitting hard, precisely because the germans are trying to create fiscal union, and ultimately more accountability for the budgets of these peripheral countries, is hurting pretty bad. europe, you're definitely going to see significant cont
unlikely that there could be that kind of evidence in the e.u. so i think we're going to see a very similar result in europe. >> reporter: still, another issue has popped up to plague the search giant, the state department today called a planned humanitarian visit to north korea by google executive chairman eric schmidt, "not helpful." and stressed he's traveling as a private citizen, not a representative of the u.s. government. >> susie: the auto industry closed out 2012 with a bang, marking its best year since 2005. december sales of cars and trucks were better than expected, and 2013 looks to be another banner year for the industry. ruben ramirez reports. >> reporter: worries about the fiscal cliff weren't enough to keep buyers out of car dealerships last month. people were buying a lot of cars and trucks. >> there gets to be that certain point where buying that used car or even leasing a new a new one or even just outright buying a new one, it's really not that much more to buy a new vehicle and you can get that joy of that new car smell. >> reporter: helping auto sales last year is tha
.s. and e.u. at the same time, i think we need to be realistic. i was -- [inaudible] what was that? over ten years ago, and i think there were unnecessarily optimistic views about how quickly it could be done and uncomplicated it was. it turned out that caution was better part of judgment. i think they would have to be willing essentially to open up the markets and not use various procedures to try to safeguard their market. so i favor proceedings, but with an understanding that there are immense issues to be looked at. and it's not going happen very, very quickly. i'm in favor of starting it. [inaudible] it's fancy language for -- regulations. whether allow european -- to you see opportunities to streamline the way the two economies governor themselves? >> it's the latter. let me put it this way. we have dealt with the issues regarding safeguards, safeguards and others with ore countries. we did that in negotiation with colombia. we did that in negotiations with panama. if any two entities resolve those issues, it's the e.u. and united states. essentially what the e.u. has been doing, in my
in europe and the u.s. the european process is a finding at the e.u. level. we have been for investigation for it almost two years by the commissioner there and his staff. during this period, they comment from everybody and we give them literally millions of documents. we are busy negotiating with them. we don't think we violated any european laws, but we're happy to have the conversation and we're sort of now waiting on with a they decide to do. we have been negotiating back and forth and they have announced that publicly. in the united states, the law is similar but different if the way it's applied. in our indication, the government to have the federal trade commission look at this and a similar investigation is underway. there were a series of hearings. i testified at the hearings and, again, i don't see the consumer arm under section 2 and we have asked the government to come back and give us the examples of things which are violations of law. we haven't seen that yet. we are also in negotiations with them. that's probably all i should say. what i would say is we talk to these people
by the eu level, and we have been under investigation for almost two years by the commissioner there and his staff. we have given over literally millions of documents. we do not think we violated any european laws, but you know, we are happy to be part of the conversation. we are waiting on what they decide to do. we are negotiating. they announced that publicly. and the united states, the law is similar, but different. in our case, the government decided to have the anti-trade commission to look at this. again, i do not see the consumer harm under section ii, and we'll ask the government to come back and give us examples of violations of the law. we have not seen that. we are also in negotiations with them. and that is probably all we should say. we are hopeful -- the ideal scenario would be that we come to a mutual agreement with both. >> thinking about that, and you mentioned these other initiatives york involved in. is there -- how do you decide where to focus, what to focus on when you look at planning for 2013? you have such a huge range of things. >> you used the wrong word. you do no
minister david cameron made a critical speech on the uk's rocky relationship with the eu. cameron proposed a bold referendum to allow british voters to decide whether or not to exit the alliance by 2016. >> there's no doubt we're more powerful than washington, delhi because we're a powerful player inside the union that matters for british jobs, and security. it matters to our ability to get things done in the world. it matters to the united states and other friends around the world, which is why many tell us clearly they want britain to remain in the european union. if we left the european union, it would be a one-way ticket, not a return. >>> let's take an early look at the markets. we'll get all up in your business this morning. steve sedgwick is live in london, which is still at this hour firmly part of the european union. >> and set to be for a bit longer. there was a huge caveat to what david cameron said there in that sound bite. he wants more competition in europe, more accountability, better growth and wants us to get out of the eurozone debt crisis. he wants to renegotiate with eu
that there could be that kind of evidence in the e.u. so i think we're going to see a very similar result in europe. >> reporter: still, another issue has popped up to plague the search giant, the state department today called a planned humanitarian visit to north korea by google executive chairman eric schmidt, "not helpful." and stressed he's traveling as a private citizen, not a representative of the u.s. government. >> susie: the auto industry closed out 2012 with a bang, marking its best year since 2005. december sales of cars and trucks were better than expected, and 2013 looks to be another banner year for the industry. ruben ramirez reports. >> reporter: worries about the fiscal cliff weren't enough to keep buyers out of car dealerships last month. people were buying a lot of cars and trucks. >> there gets to be that certain point where buying that used car or even leasing a new a new one or even just outright buying a new one, it's really not that much more to buy a new vehicle and you can get that joy of that new car smell. >> reporter: helping auto sales last year is that the average age
on the first count and now it turns out that they are not right about that one either. according to eu magazine, the cars were not recycle. they shredded them. that process sent tons of parts to landfills each year. so which cars ended up in the shredder? that list is tonight's top five. number five is the chevy blazer. 50 miles per gallon, about a clunker. this gm classic is clearly a clunker. it was redesigned in the '90s is a smaller percentage before being discontinued. before that, the dodge caravan. it was one of the biggest hits for chrysler. the company plans to make them through 2014. the jeep grand cherokee is another one. this vehicle is still popular with off-road enthusiast even though it only gets about 50 miles per gallon. number two is the board f150. but it only gets about 17 miles per gallon. in the number one most traded in clunker is the ford explorer. very popular in the late '90s and early two 2000. it gets about 20 miles per gallon. and the number one was the toyota corolla. it gets much better gas mileage and many of those. that was the car that these clunkers were treat
to respond. they have not taken any decisions beyond that. it is now for a eu states coming up at the 12th of march deadline whether or not they want to amend that in any way. it could be an unmanned -- amended so it would apply to the regime and not to opposition forces. it could be amended in many other ways. it would require the agreement of all member states. >> i understand we are already supplying equipment to elements within the surreal -- syria opposition. i am interested to know, that could be military. how strict is this embargo? is it possible if we are giving communications equipment that could be used a in conjunction with weaponry supplied by turkey? or some other countries to elements within the opposition? >> it is not military. it is certainly not lethal. the assistance includes things like the deployment of our response team to work with their opposition on their future plans. how they are getting help to people with basic needs. we are training through citizen journalist. we are providing water purification hits and generators to help civilians. -- water purification kit
between the u.s. and the e.u.. at the same time, i think we need to be realistic. i was at doha -- what was that, over ten years ago? and i think there were unnecessarily optimistic views about how quickly it could be done and how uncomplicated it was. and it turned out that caution was the better part of judgment. the e.u. has immense regulatory issues, and i think they would have to be willing, essentially, to open up their markets and not use various procedures to try to safeguard their market. so, um, i favor proceeding but with an understanding that there are immense issues to be, to be looked at. and it's not going to happen very, very quickly. but i'm in fave of starting it -- i'm in favor of starting it. >> [inaudible] nontariff trade barriers which is just simply fancy language for, you know -- >> exactly. >> -- for regulations, you know, whether we're going to allow european feeds that might be con -- needs that might be contaminated with mad cow disease, and they have the same concerns. inevitably out of that is going to come a reconfiguration of the regulatory safety net on
in the motor race, though. we've had a big eu change on the agenda. >> yeah. >> we don't know how that's going to come out in the wash, do we? >> that changes things around. but in the short-term, it does mean that the markets are a little more volatile and it has been a sizable change. >> it's just unfortunate to some degree that these natural disasters which affect many people and are stressful events to live through then cause insurance premium toes rise, which sounds like that's what's happening in part of the u.s. >> it varies, but long-term insurers will look to make profit over a period of time. when they do happen, they have to look at have they been in line with all their expectations? >> and what's happening with capacity? it's dictated by capacity levels. >> yeah. pnc, capital comes in and out frequently been we are seeing money coming into the insurance sector. as capacity comes in, rates will go down. >> i want to talk about life, but first to cap off what happened with superstorm sandy, it took a while to get a sense of how costly that event was. what's emerging? >> i think most
brown with your fox news minute. talk of britain leaving the european union. eu membership will be up to a referendum. voters should decide whether the uk should stay in the 27 member euro zone. the first priority is renegotiating the eu treaty. timothy geithner at last they will be friday. president obama has elected jack lew. much of the u.s. experiencing the coldest temperatures in two years. for death are blamed on the cold snap. the bitter conditions are expected to stay into the weekend. dagen, back to you. dagen: jamie dimon apologizing. also, stepping up and saying back off. there is more regulation needed. he said all of this at the world economic forum. we are president and chief investment officer. he is in rochester, new york. maybe the only place on the planet that is colder than where you are sitting right now. >> happy to be here. dagen: what do you say to jamie dimon? there was one hedge fund manager that went after him. he said back off. >> well, jamie is right about the capitalization. he has incredibly strong capital. a lot of the standards forced the banks to have
. defended dialogue with hamas. refused to join in a letter calling on e.u. to condemn hezbollah. he had a pejorative comment to jewish lobby. he has taken stances that indicateed he is less than supportive of the relationship with israel. >> there are two key democrats that could factor in how this goes. one is new york democratic senator schumer. >> he is staying quiet on the fight. talk about the real oppositio opposition. i think there will be some tough hurdles to get over with republicans. but i don't think there is enough democratic fight to stop the nomination. out of loyalty to the president who don't want him appointed will vote for him. >> bret: john kerry, fair to say he has an easy ride? >> yeah. it's an opportunity to get questions answered on benghazi or put it front and center in how the future of the state department will be run. no, i don't think there is any problem with him. >> bret: you agree, carl? >> it's interesting hearing. i agree that the committee means he gets approved but he will be asked about benghazi and about the basic tenets. and he will go on about the
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